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Poems to SolveJuan Bobo and the PigThe Ancestor TreePaco and the WitchThose Calculating CrowsBilly and EmmaElizabeti's DollWho's In the HallMama ElizabetiA Safe Place Called HomeElizabeti's SchoolIt Rainded All Day That NightYou're Not My Real MotherAfrican American Read-AloudSky DancerscookbookGuess AgainphphDreaming-Up-cvr
Forgiveness-Garden-thumbnail-cvrAmazing_Places-thumbThe_Cambodian_Dancer-thumbAntsyAnselcvr
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publications


cover A Safe Place


A Safe Place Called Home
by Eileen Spinelli, illustrated by Christy Hale
(Marshall Cavendish, 2001)
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description
To small children with vivid imaginations, scary things can be anywhere and everywhere. Barking dogs, blaring sirens, thunder and lightning. . . . What then, when fantasy takes over to make matters even worse? What is a child to do when sharks appear in large puddles and scarecrows grin hideously? Days like these and especially bedtimes like these call for a picture book just like this. The gentle but insistent reminder that Mom and Dad are near will calm the worst fears. And, when seen from the safety of a snug bed, the cleverly depicted images of yowling tomcats and creeping spiders will incite no fear, only a sense of adventure.
reviews
"Combined with Hale's terrifically moody illustrations, this book skillfully flirts with childhood fears without truly scaring readers. . . . This book should fit nicely into a discussion of fears, safety, and the pitfalls of an overactive imagination. Appropriate for beginning readers, it may also serve as a reassuring bedtime story."
School Library Journal

(Ages 5-7) An imaginative young boy walks home from school, frightened by one scary (or not so scary) thing after another.
At the end of each verse comes the refrain "home is the place to be." In the end, his parents welcome him home with smiles and a hug. The lines of the verse flow rhythmically and the rhymes are sure. Hale makes good use of the double-page spreads in her colorful illustrations, which are varied and sometimes dramatic in composition. Teachers looking for a good book about fears, real and imagined, may want to read this one aloud.
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